Monday , November 23 2020

Is Hearing Loss Scaring You?

Hearing Loss Have you noticed that your hearing may be limiting your activities and social interactions? Many people that take the next step in hearing healthcare see an improvement in all areas of their lives.  The solutions to hearing problems have been improved over the years.  For example, hearing aids are no longer the clunky, large devices and are more discreet, and technologically advanced.
Research demonstrates the considerable effects of hearing loss on development as well as negative social, psychological, cognitive and health effects of untreated hearing loss. Each can have far-reaching implications that go well beyond hearing alone. In fact, those who have difficulty hearing can experience such distorted and incomplete communication that it seriously impacts their professional and personal lives, at times leading to isolation and withdrawal.
Studies have linked untreated hearing loss effects to:
• irritability, negativism and anger
• fatigue, tension, stress and depression
• avoidance or withdrawal from social situations
• social rejection and loneliness
• reduced alertness and increased risk to personal safety
• impaired memory and ability to learn new tasks
• reduced job performance and earning power
• diminished psychological and overall health
“Loss of hearing is a medical condition that is associated with physical, emotional, mental and social well-being. Depression, anxiety, emotional instability, phobias, withdrawal, isolation, lessened health status and lessened self-esteem have all been linked to uncorrected hearing loss.” (National Council on Aging: Untreated Hearing Loss Linked to Depression, Anxiety, Isolation in Seniors) A major reason why millions of Americans living with untreated hearing loss should take action is safety.  Studies have linked untreated hearing loss to reduced alertness. Unheard and, therefore, unheeded traffic sounds, doorbells, telephones, alarms, and cries for help compromise the safety of those with hearing loss and everyone around them. The failure to hear smoke detectors and take quick action is the major reason adults 65 or older are more than twice as likely as any other age group to die in a home fire.
At HearUSA, we take the time to educate patients about hearing loss and promote the importance of prevention and treatment. Visit www.HearUSA.com to find basic information about hearing loss, including advances in diagnosis and treatment, hearing aid options, and resources for financial assistance.
If you think you or a loved one suffers from hearing loss, don’t delay another day. Visit a HearUSA Center near you and take the first step toward a world of better hearing.
Why Seeking Help Is So Important
• Those living with untreated hearing loss may not be aware that failure to take corrective action could result in the brain actually “forgetting” how to hear and understand speech. This condition is called auditory deprivation, and the longer the period before treatment, the more likely it is that the brain will forget how to process speech, even after treatment is implemented.
• Almost all (95 percent) of Americans with hearing loss can be treated with hearing aids.
• Nine out of ten hearing aid users report improvements in quality of life.
• The use of hearing aids is associated with reductions in anger, frustration, paranoia, anxiety and overall improvements in quality of life and emotional stability.
• In November 2010, The Better Hearing Institute reported studies have shown that the use of hearing aids can help the Alzheimer’s patients. Because there is a strong link between hearing loss and cognitive function, they, in partnership with The Alzheimer’s Association, are encouraging hearing health professionals to raise awareness of Alzheimer’s, its early warning signs, and the related implications of unaddressed
hearing loss.
• Treatment of hearing loss will improve interpersonal relationships and social activity.
• Successful treatment of hearing loss with hearing aids is associated with greater earning power.
• Use of hearing aids will allow those with hearing loss to live more safely, securely, and independently.
Meet our Audiologist: Danielle Rosier, Au.D., F-AAA
Audiologists complete, at minimum, an undergraduate and master’s level degree in audiology and a supervised clinical fellowship program prior to obtaining state licensure and national certification.
Originally from Ocala, Dr. Rosier became interested in hearing health after observing an audiologist work with a hearing impaired patient. She was amazed at how the patient’s life transformed and decided she wanted to help people and make positive changes in their lives.
Dr. Rosier graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders from the University of Florida in 2008 and stayed in Gainesville to earn her Audiology Doctorate in 2012.  She is a recipient of the Thomas B. Abbot Excellence in Audiology Award in 2012. Dr. Rosier is also on the Board of the Hearing Loss Association in the area.
Currently a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology and the Florida Academy of Audiology, Dr. Rosier focuses on adult and pediatric diagnostic audiometry, tinnitus evaluation and management, amplification, auditory electrophysiology, and aural rehabilitation counseling.
“Being an audiologist is my passion. Improving the quality of life for my patients and their families by offering one-on-one personalized care is so rewarding. My goal is to empower patients to manage their hearing loss and improve their quality of life by providing patient-centered care that incorporates evidence-based practice, compassion and expertise.”
HearUSA
Brownwood Town Center . The Villages
855-270-1587 | www.hearusa.com

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